Tag Archives: Port Adelaide

Queen Mary 2

Having got myself started on passenger liner photos in An Evening in the Rocks, I just happened to find the Queen Mary 2 in Adelaide a couple of weeks later.

I own a 5 metre runabout style boat so popped it in the water near Outer Harbor (where Adelaide’s passenger terminal is located) to combine an afternoon’s crabbing with a spin over to see the Queen Mary 2.

But yet again while photographing the Cunard Queens, the lighting was rubbish with thickish middle level cloud producing a dull, cold and contrastless light. That’s three out of three times I’ve struck these conditions photographing the Cunard Queen liners. Grrrrr… And the crabs weren’t very cooperative on the day either. At least the sea was calm.

So, hopefully having not put you off entirely, some images of Queen Mary 2.

Queen Mary 2 , Outer Harbor

Queen Mary 2 towering over Adelaide’s underwhelming passenger terminal.

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National Railway Museum (Part 3 – Everything Else)

This is the concluding post of a three part exploration of the National Railway Museum located in suburban Port Adelaide. If you haven’t already visited the first two posts, I invite you to first visit Part 1 and Part 2. Part 1 looks at the narrow gauge steam locomotives that powered South Australia’s mid-north narrow gauge network, while Part 2 explores the history of the State’s broad gauge network. This third post is a bit of a catch all, covering a selection of the museum’s other rolling stock.

First up, a quick look at some of the South Australia’s private railways.

BHP Steam Locomotive No. 4

BHP Limited operated a short line between the company’s Iron Knob iron ore mine and the town of Whyalla.  Rather than turn to British types like the government railways, BHP sourced two 4-6-0 steam locomotives from the US maker, Baldwin Locomotive Works, in 1914. BHP 4 has that classic US look, even though a cow catcher wasn’t fitted.

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National Railway Museum (Part 2 – Broad Gauge)

This is the second post of a three part exploration of the National Railway Museum located in suburban Port Adelaide.

Rather than repeat the introduction to the museum and South Australia’s railway systems, I invite you to visit Part 1 if you have not already done so. Part 1 looks at the narrow gauge steam locomotives that powered South Australia’s mid-north narrow gauge network.

In this post, attention will turn to South Australia’s 5 foot 3 inch broad gauge railways.

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National Railway Museum (Part 1 – Narrow Gauge)

I’ve found myself going through a plane, train and ship spotting phase this year, and recently spent a day visiting two of the three transport related museums situated in the Port Adelaide area.

I should mention at this point that I don’t plan for Photo Morsels to morph into a machinery-spotter’s paradise to the exclusion of all else. I will revert to other subjects once I have worked off all this machinery spotting!

I’ve previously posted images from the South Australian Aviation Museum here. In this and some following posts, I’ll cover the second museum visited, the National Railway Museum.

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South Australian Aviation Museum

South Australia’s annual Port Festival was held on the weekend of 19-20th October.  The festival is held in suburban Port Adelaide, the location of South Australia’s primary commercial shipping facilities. There were activities of all sorts, providing both arty/cultural experiences and opportunities to explore the history of the Port Adelaide district (which dates back to the original settlement of Adelaide in 1836).

What caught my eye while reviewing the list of events was an offer of free entry to three separate museums that respectively record South Australia’s aviation, maritime and railway histories.  Having immersed myself quite deeply in old sailing ships over the past few months (as you may have noticed from my September posts), I decided to pass on the maritime museum and give the aviation and railway museums a visit.  In this post, I’ll cover the South Australian Aviation Museum and return in later posts to the railway museum.

Please note that I’m trying out WordPress’s multi-page post functionality for the first time and have spread this post over three pages to help with page loading speeds. You should find a list of page numbers at the bottom of each page below the Share and Like buttons. Use these to navigate to other pages. I’m not overly keen on how WordPress displays the page links so far below the main body of the post, but apparently it’s embedded pretty deeply in their programming.  I’d be interested in hearing your comments about this and whether I should use this functionality again in future posts.

South Australia Aviation Museum

Overview of the museum’s main hanger. The combination of the Port Festival publicity and free entry drew a good crowd.

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Dutch Tall Ships in Australia (Under Sail)

Welcome to my fourth and concluding post covering a visit of three Dutch tall ships Europa, Oosterschelde and Tecla to Australia.

If you have just arrived here, then you may wish to first view the earlier posts:

Dutch Tall Ships in Australia (The Initial Encounter)

Dutch Tall Ships in Australia (Port Adelaide Open Day)

Dutch Tall Ships in Australia (In the Twilight Zone)

On the morning after the Port Adelaide open day, the ships set sail for Melbourne, accompanied by the local sail training ship One and All which was sailing down as far as Kangaroo Island. Another glorious early spring day and a good spectator fleet was on hand to farewell the four ships. I popped my own boat in the water (all five metres of it!) and followed the fleet down the Port River and out into the gulf. Wind was a steady 10-12 knot northerly and the sea was near flat.  Couldn’t have been a better day.

Europa, departing Port Adelaide

The Europa led the fleet down the Port River, surrounded by a spectator fleet of local yachts and power boats.  The fleet headed north for five miles (8 km) after leaving their berths. With the light northerly breeze, it was motors on, with the jibs and stay sails set solely for decoration.

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Dutch Tall Ships (In the Twilight Zone)

Welcome back to the third post of my tall ships series. After the open day at Port Adelaide finished, I ducked across the other side of the Port River hoping to get some good late afternoon/twilight shots of the moored ships.

If you have just arrived at this post, you may wish to first explore my two earlier tall ship posts:

The Initial Encounter
Port Adelaide Open Day

I’ve probably said enough about the ships in those earlier posts, so I’ll just dive into the photos.  Presented broadly in chronological order, so you can follow the changing mood as the light started out as a golden sunset and then faded to blue.

Tall Ships Port Adelaide

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